Poor families in low-income countries, like Sabitri and her husband in West Bengal, can’t afford further hardships. 24-year-old Sabitri and her husband migrated from their tribal village to West Bengal for work in a brick field. Things had been tough for the young couple and they were hoping that the fresh start and income from their manual labour would improve their lives. But their troubles continued. They lost their first two children to illness and 6 months later Sabitri went blind in both eyes. They did not seek any medical treatment for her because of their fears and superstitions. Their one joy was the birth of their third daughter, Lakshmi, named after the Goddess of Fortune and Wealth.

Sabitri blind holding baby Lakshmi

Sabitri blind holding baby Lakshmi

Their joy, however, was marred with sadness. Sabitri couldn’t see or care for Lakshmi. The couple despaired. Sabitri dreamt about gazing into Lakshmi’s face and seeing her baby smile back at her.

A 15-Minute Cataract Surgery Changed Sabitri’s Life

Sabitri with one eye patch

Sabitri after cataract surgery on one eye

The family's luck was about to change. A community field worker found Sabitri and brought her to a screening camp where she was diagnosed with cataract in both eyes. Thanks to the generosity of our donors, she and her family were transported to the eye hospital where Sabitri underwent life-changing cataract surgery free of charge.

When Sabitri’s eye patch was removed, she saw her beautiful baby, Lakshmi, for the first time and smiled with immense joy. She said “she’s even more beautiful than I imagined.” Lakshmi looked lovingly into her mother’s eyes and giggled.

The young family feels hopeful about their future for the first time. Now that Sabitri can see, she can care for her baby, she can return to work and her family can thrive.

Sabitri seeing baby for first time

Sabitri seeing her baby for the first time!

A $50 donation can provide sight-restoring cataract surgery for someone just like Sabitri.

                                                                

Cataracts are Common and Treatable 

Globally, cataracts are the leading cause of treatable blindness, accounting for no less than 34% of all cases of  blindness, representing approximately 65 million people. The vast majority are women living in developing countries.

What is a cataract?
A cataract refers to opacification or clouding of the eye lens leading to loss of vision as it becomes increasingly difficult, if not impossible for light rays from objects in view to pass through the opaque lens before being focused on the retina at the back of the eye.

What is cataract surgery?
Cataract surgery is one of the most perfected surgeries in the world. Available surgical options include phacoemulsification, extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE), Small Incision Cataract Surgery (SICS) and intracapsular cataract extraction (ICCE).

 

 

 

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