Like most first-time parents, Esther and Paul Samson in the Chikwawa District of Malawi, were thrilled when their son Yohane Paulo arrived. They were enraptured by Yohane’s beautiful, smiling face.

When Yohane was 5 months old his parents began to notice a change. Their happy baby boy was no longer smiling at them, he was going blind. “As he got older, we began to see white spots in his eyes but we didn’t know what to do. My husband and I are farmers and we both need to work to survive but I couldn’t because I had to stay home and care for Yohane,” said Esther.

When Yohane was 2 years old, a female eye care advocate trained to find children who need care, came to their home. Upon examining Yohane, the eye care advocate suspected he was suffering from bilateral cataracts and convinced Esther and Paul to take him to a screening. There it was confirmed that Yohane needed sight-restoring cataract surgery in both eyes.

“I was nervous but hopeful that Yohane would get his sight back and that would bring change to our family,” said Esther. Yohane and his family were transported to the nearest eye hospital where he had two successful surgeries.

Recently, the eye care advocate followed up and reported that a very thankful Esther is back working alongside her husband on their farm and Yohane has gained his sight and his smile back.

Yohane Seva Canada blind baby Malawi

Yohane recovering from surgery. ©Penny Lyons

 

Sight Stories and News

  • 7 Silent Signs You Might Have Cataracts

    Cataracts are the leading cause of treatable blindness worldwide. How do you know if you have them? Good question, read our blog to find out.

    Blog | August 22nd, 2019
  • Glasses? Check! Ready for Kindergarten? Check!

    Milka was always bumping into things and her eyes didn't track properly when she was watching the chickens in the yard. Read her story and find out how you helped Milka and her worried mother.

    Sight stories | August 7th, 2019
  • India Eye Care Center Finds Middle Way To Capitalism

    The push for more efficiency forces down the average cost of a surgery for Aravind. But that doesn't mean quality is sacrificed. Aravind surgeons have just half the number of complications that the British health system has for the same procedure. That high quality allows Aravind to attract patients who are willing to pay market rates. Then it takes the large profit made on those surgeries to fund free and subsidized surgeries for poor people.

    Blog | July 23rd, 2019