Rorng is a 14 year-old boy from Cambodia. He and his 4 siblings live with their grandmother in a rural area a few hours outside of Siem Reap because their parents work long hours in the city to support the family.

Rorng was born blind and relied on his grandmother to care for him most of his young life. Until recently, he couldn’t dress, eat or go to the bathroom without help.

Torng Cambodian boy vision test post surgeryWhen Rorng’s grandmother heard that a Seva-sponsored screening camp was coming to their village, she was hopeful that something could be done to help her grandson. Rorng was quiet and shy as he was screened by a field worker at the local pagoda. Suspecting cataract, the field worker referred Rorng to a nearby surgical camp and organized transportation for him and his grandmother the next day.
“I want to go to school like my friends.” - Rorng

At the eye camp, an ophthalmologist diagnosed Rorng with cataracts. His grandmother was delighted to discover that his blindness could be cured through surgery. When asked what he hoped for most, Rorng’s answer was simple: “I want to go to school like my friends.”

Torng Cambodian boy Smiling after bandage removal
The following day, when the bandage was removed from his left eye, Rorng looked astonished as he realized he could see for the first time in his life. Then, as he made eye contact with his grandmother, astonishment turned to joy and a huge smile spread across his face. On the bus ride home, Rorng was glued to the window as he took in the world around him.

Because of the generosity of donors like you, Rorng can see. And because he can see, he can go to school, play with friends and grow up to lead a healthy and productive life.

On behalf of Rorng, and all those who have been given the power of sight as a result of your support, thank you so much for your generosity.

Torng Cambodian boy happy at home

Rorng happy at home

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