Pembi Sherpa, a Nepalese teenager living in a remote village near Khandbari, should be going to school and dreaming of a bright future but instead she was sad, depressed and saw a long, dark life ahead of her.

Pembi Sherpa before surgery

Pembi before surgery

While in grade 6, Pembi started having difficulty in school; she could no longer see the blackboard and follow what was being taught. Feeling hopeless, she quit school and began taking care of her older brother’s children and doing housework to help her mother. As her vision worsened, even routine tasks became impossible. She often wondered what kind of future she would have if she couldn't see.

Pembi’s mother learned of a Seva eye camp being held nearby, and with her heart full of hope that her daughter’s vision could be restored, travelled with Pembi to the site. 

Pembi with bandage over her eye

Pembi after surgery

At the camp, the eye care team determined that Pembi had cataracts in both eyes and performed sight-restoring surgery. After her bandages were removed, Pembi was so happy and excited that she was speechless. “There are no words to express my joy and happiness. I can’t wait to start my new life!” said Pembi while her mother welled up with tears.

Pembi Sherpa after surgery

Pembi seeing for the first time in years!

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